Saturday, December 26, 2009

King Tut

King Tut is - the pioneer - in museum blockbuster exhibition.

The year was 1976, in New York, when 8 million people attended the King Tut exhibit at the Metropolitan Museum. Toronto got a taste of the blockbuster in 1979 when the exhibit came to the Art Gallery of Ontario.

The show has returned to Toronto.

I did not see the show 30 years ago - as I was not around. I will probably miss it again this time. But with all the marketing and promotion, it is hard to not notice, especially the image of the sarcophagus which was used extensively to market the event.

The sarcophagus of King Tut is indeed quite a beautiful object. Without it, the blockbuster might never have occurred. To study it, I have made a number of line drawings. If they look fun to you, print some for colouring.

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Abstract line drawing / The 10,000 Page Colouring Book

6 comments:

eyecontact said...

Your wonderful work makes me smile. Also makes me want to do more line drawings. Inspiring!

Nancy Bea Miller said...

I saw that show in NYC! I was just a kid but it left a big impression on me (dark, solemn, very gold!) Thanks for the reminder.

Simonette said...

Too cool - great variety!

Jon said...

cool... i'll for sure try and get to the AGO and check this out!

i've been lurking around your blog for some time now... don't comment much...

but i thought i'd tell you how much i've enjoyed your project and your theory of drawing (read on your other site)... thanks for sharing your work!

hope you're having a nice holiday season


[word verification asks for *manifis*]

Vhrsti said...

Perfect! Absolutely perfect!

Kon Abaga said...

I have visited this site and got lots of information than other site visited before a month.


work and study